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Showing posts from April, 2017

4/27-28 Thursday-Friday

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Guiding Question: What were the most important battles fought in the East during the Civil War?


Objectives: Collaborative: Students will learn about the battles of Bull Run and Antietam by reading primary and secondary sources, completing a Say-Mean-Matter chart, and writing a CEREAL paragraph with a score of at least 3/4 according to the rubric. 

Independent: Students will learn about the Union's naval strategy by reading, watching a video, and answering guiding questions with at least 80% accuracy. 


Standards:
8.10.6 - Describe critical developments and events in the war, including the major battles, geographical advantages and obstacles, technological advances, and General Lee’s surrender at Appomattox.
W.1 - Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence ELD B.6 - Read closely to determine how meaning is made
Do Now (Voice Level 0) 5 minutes:  - On your objective tracker, dissect the objectives you will be working to complete for today. Be prepared to expl…

4/26 Wednesday

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Guiding Question:  Why did many soldiers enlist to fight in the Civil War?

Objectives:  Collaborative: Students will understand the lives of soldiers in the American Civil War by reading, creating a Soldier I.D. and writing a short narrative  with a score of at least 3/4 according to the rubric. 

Standards: 

8.10.5. Study the views and lives of leaders (e.g., Ulysses S. Grant, Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee) and soldiers on both sides of the war, including those of black soldiers and regiments.
CCRA.R.1 – Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Do Now (Voice Level 0) 2 Minutes:  Write today's objective on your tracker. 
Whole Class (Voice Level 0) 5 Minutes:  ID Card Intro/Explanation of today's assignment 
View Civil War soldier photographs


Whole Class Independent (Voice Level 0) 38 Minutes: 

Step 1: Read the source about preparing for…

4/24-25 Monday-Tuesday

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Guiding Question: What were the first shots of the Civil War?


Objectives: Collaborative: Students will describe the first battle of the Civil War by reading, annotating, and answering guiding questions with at least 80% accuracy. 

Independent: Students will work to increase their Lexile levels by determining the central ideas of an Achieve article about the first shots of war, complete the first four tabs, and score at least 75% on the activity. 


Standards: 8.10.6 - Describe critical developments and events in the war, including the major battles, geographical advantages and obstacles, technological advances, and General Lee’s surrender at Appomattox.
CCRA.R.1 – Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. ELD A.1 - Exchanging information and ideas with others.
Do Now (Voice Level 0) 5 minutes:  On your objective tracker, dissect the objectives…

4/20-21 Thursday-Friday

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Guiding Question: How did the election of Abraham Lincoln lead to Civil War?


Objectives: Collaborative (Whole Group): Students will learn about the election of Abraham Lincoln and the South's secession by collaboratively reading and answering questions with at least 80% accuracy. 


Standards: 8.10 Students analyze the multiple causes, key events, and complex consequences of the Civil War.
CCRA.R.1 – Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. ELD B.6 - Reading closely to determine how meaning is made.
Do Now (Voice Level 0) 5 minutes:  On your objective tracker, dissect the objectives you will be working to complete for today. Be prepared to explain the objectives in your own words if I call on you. 
Whole Group (Voice Level 0) 5 minutes:  Lincoln's Election Intro
Whole Group Collaborative (Voice Level .5 - 1) 30 minutes: Step 1:Read th…

4/19 Wednesday

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Guiding Question:  How did John Brown try to bring an end to slavery?

Objectives:  Independent: Students will understand the steady attempts to abolish slavery by reading about John Brown's Raid on Harper's Ferry and answer guiding questions with at least 80% accuracy. 

Standards: 
8.9 - Students analyze the early and steady attempts to abolish slavery and to realize the ideals of the Declaration of Independence.


CCRA.R.1 – Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Do Now (Voice Level 0) 2 Minutes:  Write today's objective on your tracker. 
Whole Class (Voice Level 0) 5 Minutes:  John Brown's Raid Introduction 


Whole Class Independent (Voice Level 0) 38 Minutes: 
Step 1: Read the John Brown's Raid Comic answer the guiding questions 
Step 2: Synthesize what you learned by creating a title and a poster for a movie based on John …

4/17-18 Monday-Tuesday

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Guiding Question: How was the movement to preserve slavery reflected in the Dred Scott v. Sanford decision?


Objectives: Collaborative: Students will analyze the significance of the Dred Scott case by reading collaboratively and participating in a "Save the Last Word for Me" with a score of at least 3/4 according to the rubric. 

Independent: Students will work to increase their Lexile levels by determining the central ideas of an Achieve article about Dred Scott, completing the first four tabs, and scoring at least 75% on the activity. 


Standards: 8.9.5. Analyze the significance of the States’ Rights Doctrine, the Missouri Compromise (1820), the Wilmot Proviso (1846), the Compromise of 1850, Henry Clay’s role in the Missouri Compromise and the Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854), the Dred Scott v. Sandford decision (1857), and the Lincoln-Douglas debates (1858).
CCRA.R.1 – Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it…

4/6-7 Thursday-Friday

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Guiding Question: What were the effects of the debate over slavery?


Objectives: Collaborative: Students will understand the divergent paths of people in the North and South by watching an episode of America: The Story of Us and completing a viewing guide with at least 80% accuracy. 

Independent: Students will learn about the Kansas-Nebraska Act and its effects by reading and completing guiding questions with at least 80% accuracy. 


Standards: 8.6 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced, with emphasis on the Northeast.
8.7 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people in the South from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced.
8.9.5 - Analyze the significance of the States' Rights Doctrine, the Missouri Compromise, the Wilmot Proviso, the Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, the Dred Scott c. Sandford decision, and the Lincoln-Douglas Debates. CCRA.R.1 – Read closely to determ…

4/5 Wednesday

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Guiding Question:  How did the debate over slavery begin to change the landscape of America?

Objectives:  Collaborative: Students will understand the steady attempts to abolish slavery by reading, annotating, and answering guiding questions with at least 80% accuracy. 

Standards: